Objects and Principles

The objectives of the Australasian Institute for Genital Autonomy are:

  1. To promote the human rights of children including their protection from medically unnecessary genital surgery and irreversible hormonal therapy (the Right of Genital Autonomy).
  2. To raise awareness in Australasian social and political culture about the Right of Genital Autonomy.
  3. To provide parents, prospective parents, educators, health care providers and the community in general with accurate information about the risks of unnecessary child genital surgery and irreversible hormonal therapy and about their impact on the Right of Genital Autonomy.
  4. To inform politicians, Governments, child protection NGOs and other stakeholders about the Right of Genital Autonomy, about the rights of children to protection from discrimination on the grounds of sex, age, race, culture and religion and about options for changing laws and policies that enable, promote or facilitate unnecessary child genital surgery.
  5. To provide the media, the general public, community groups, health care providers and other stakeholders via media release, social media and presentations with accurate information about the Right of Genital Autonomy.
  6. To lobby Governments to decline payment of health care benefits for professional services not clinically relevant to the necessary treatment of morbidity in infant and child patients.
  7. To support adults and children seeking to prevent and seeking redress for breaches of the Right of Genital Autonomy.
  8. To conduct and encourage research into the Right of Genital Autonomy.
  9. To collaborate with local and international organisations who have the same or similar Objects in relation to children generally or any class of children.
  10. To ensure that all public representations on behalf of the Institute are consistent with the Principles of the Institute.
  11. To raise funds for promoting and carrying out the Objects of the Institute.
  12. To establish and maintain a public fund to be called the AIGA PUBLIC FUND [“The Public Fund”] for the specific purpose of the promotion of the prevention or the control for behaviour that is harmful or abusive to human beings. The Public Fund is established to receive all gifts of money or property for this purpose and any money received because of such gifts must be credited to the bank account of the Institute. The Public Fund must not receive any other money or property into its account and comply with Subdivision 30-EA of the Income Tax Assessment Act. The Trustee of The Public Fund, namely the Australasian Institute for Genital Autonomy, intends that The Public Fund be established and maintained as a trust.

The principles of the Australasian Institute for Genital Autonomy are:

  1. We adopt the 2012 Helsinki Declaration of the Right to Genital Autonomy made 3 October 2012.
  2. Every child regardless of sex or cultural origin has a fundamental human right to decide for themselves when old enough whether or not they should have surgery on any part of their reproductive organs (the Right of Genital Autonomy).
  3. Australia as a state member of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) has a positive obligation to take legislative, administrative and educational steps to eradicate unnecessary genital surgery of children too young to give informed consent.
  4. The only justifications for genital surgery on a child too young to give informed consent (“necessary genital surgery”) are:
    to cure existing pathology for which genital surgery is the intervention of last resort;
    to enable the child’s immediate and foreseeable normal urogenital functioning; and
    to prevent future diseases that for the individual child are probable not merely possible.
  5. The consent of a parent to unnecessary genital surgery on a child too young to give informed consent is insufficient to justify the operator from executing the procedure.
  6. Irreversible genital surgery on a child that is not necessary is a breach of the child’s human rights.
  7. Irreversible genital surgery on a child that is not necessary and is performed by a medical practitioner is a breach of their professional ethics.
  8. The right of an adult to freedom of thought, conscience and religion does not extend to freedom to perform or arrange for unnecessary surgery on any part of a child.